Has Mexico City Ever Hosted The World Cup Mexico City to Oaxaca – The Drive

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Mexico City to Oaxaca – The Drive

It can take as little as 4.5 hours and be traffic-free and hassle-free, but you can easily experience traffic jams and road maintenance, extending the trip to six hours or more. On the other hand you can choose to extend the length of your trip by taking in several selected places and places of interest, including a snow volcano near Puebla and another peak near the mountain of Orizaba / Córdoba.

The first leg of the trip is from Mexico City to Puebla. The biggest problem you will face is leaving the capital of the country, following the road called Zaragoza. Unless you start very early, or late at night, there will be congestion, so the sellers of soft drinks and water, snacks, cold drinks, and many other foods, will be walking slowly, wandering around. through rows of parked cars, plying their trade. Therefore, getting to Puebla can take about one to three hours, the latter works mainly during rush hour and on weekends. The name of the game is patience, clarity and simplicity. And if you’re picking up a rental car at the airport, ask your employee to draw a map, and regardless of the type, always ask other drivers and pedestrians what and when to open Zaragoza. Once you are on this “road” your only problem will be to get off it. To give you a clear picture of the congestion that existed on Zaragoza, in 2004, driving a three-ton truck on the road, the police wanted to pull us over (because who knows why), the driver of the train returned several cars with the sound of the siren. . We chose to ignore the law and continue, hoping that the traffic will not allow the police to catch up and eventually stop. It worked.

Almost all roads from Mexico City to Oaxaca have well-paved and tolled roads. The signs are large and well written. However, a few important points are in order. You want to be where it says “cuota” and not “road,” the first being a toll road and the last being a smaller, single highway. “Autopista” is always a toll. On the way to Puebla you will see signs to guide you to the city, and then from Puebla, signs to Oaxaca. Main roads have two lanes in each direction, one lane and one lane, or one lane. However, custom dictates that cars slow down to the right and onto the shoulder when they see you coming, so regardless of the type of highway, you should generally travel at your normal speed. There is, however, as with any law. Sometimes, for example, large tractors are too wide to move enough to allow you to pass. But when they see that the road ahead is clear, they put a left sign, telling you that it’s okay to go left… assuming you trust them. A solid center line tends to be impressive and you’ll quickly realize that when traffic moves to the right of you, you can pass even a solid line… unless there’s an important curve, peak or valley ahead. Along the way there are many gas stations, many of which now have “The Italian Coffee Company” next door, and clean washrooms. Credit cards are generally accepted for top-up, and even at most payment terminals…except when the machine breaks down.

Leaving Mexico City you will pass several comedors on each side of the highway. You will climb slowly, through easy passes, and leave behind the smoke of the valley. Its beauty is not unique, but the ease with which you will be able to negotiate the curves at the right speed will also make the place undefined. The bends and valleys will be so spectacular that there will be a red line on the road to indicate where cars with brake failure must travel, leading them off the road and onto a path that ends in soft grass.

You’ll see several routes to the city of Puebla, labeled “Puebla Centro.” Puebla makes a great stop for a day or two, if you’re not in a hurry to get to Oaxaca. It’s big and sprawling, but the city center is smaller, smaller and full of fun shops, art, restaurants and clean, affordable hotels. Within a few blocks of the zócalo are fine hotels, a large pedestrian street with many shops, and Los Sapos, a few streets full of art, antiques and collectibles. Arrive at the weekend and there is an open market. On Sundays there is a large temporary market selling crafts, plants, etc., two blocks down. In the same area there is a place called Parián, and the Barrio de Artista, both not to be missed. Of course there are ruins nearby and other places, but a short stop is a city that is a “must see.” For a splurge spend the night at Mesón Sacristía (listed in the coffee book of the 1,000 best hostels in America) in Los Sapos. For the budget, stay at Palas or Palace, at 2 Oriente, a block from the zócalo and four blocks from Los Sapos.

The journey from Puebla to Oaxaca, without a few stops, takes about three and a half hours. However, in 2007 to 2008 there are two or three road construction sites that will slow you down. Again, be patient, turn off your engine, and see what the dealer has to offer. And in the checkout area there will be many offerings, from the special Poblano sweets called camotes, to wheat tortillas, to puppies. Two roads become one and a half, as you approach the right turn to continue to Tehuacan and Oaxaca. You will see an impressive snow peak as you look towards Orizába (but don’t take that road or you will end up in Veracruz).

Then there are two official places, unless you also want to stay in Tehuacan. The first one is at the onyx/marble village of San Antonio Texcala. Take the second Tehuacan exit (after the Tehuacan toll booth), on highway 125 to Huajuapan. After 6 km you will reach the village, with five or more factory shops where you can find everything that these stones can be made — tequila sets, bowls, sinks, lamps, tables, bowls, boxes, unicorns, fish, hash pipes, as well as several different decorations with religious images. Prices are about half of what you will pay elsewhere.

Next is the Museo de Agua, or the water museum, which is actually a misnomer because it’s so much more. Take the well-known exit when you return to the autopista, that of Sangabriel and Chilac. There will also be signs for the museum. You will be shown (in Spanish) the main building, as well as the surrounding area. You will learn how progress is being made in educating villagers in wasteland areas where water is scarce and fertile soil is infertile, to conserve and recycle water; the use of manure, worm culture and other methods of soil enrichment; and growing and selling nutritious products such as amaranth.

In terms of places and towns, near Tehuacan you will see tall white buildings where chickens are produced and transported throughout the state of Puebla and to other countries. There will be several places designated as stopping points for visitors to admire and photograph the deep valleys and mountain peaks. The famous long bridges help to show the valleys and mountains. You will pass a geological fault. There will be several kilometers of spectacular “telephone” cactus. Along the way to Oaxaca you will see vendors on both sides of the main road selling shiny little cars.

The last payment point is called Huitzo. About 15 – 20 minutes to Oaxaca. A few minutes after entering the city, you will be given the opportunity to turn left (one of the signs is difficult to interpret), but unless you are given specific directions to go to your hotel or B&B. on the town and the zócalo.

Until 1995 when the toll road was opened from the capital to Oaxaca, on many routes you had to travel on secondary roads and highways, doubling the length of the car. Now you have the opportunity to have a short and safe trip on the famous roads, with the added bonus of the opportunity to get off the main road and enter other villages to take in more places, beautiful scenery and local culture. The only caution is not to drive outside any major city, especially on highways or toll roads, at night, unless absolutely necessary. Lighting is often absent or inadequate, and traffic laws are rarely enforced.

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